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Machine Learning Will Help Us Fix What’s Broken Before It Breaks

Digital twins, exact virtual replicas physical devices, are computer models operating identically to the physical versions, able to detect problems before they have the chance to happen in the real world. Combined with predictive machine learning, the digital twins are hoped to reduce downtime resolving problems before they even occur.

However, as Big Think reminds us on their article on machine learning, there are still devices in service predating the notion of digital twins, especially in industrial settings. Luckily there are several companies developing bridge technologies that would bring the benefits of digital twins to devices without one. They are harnessing machine learning for analyzing data to pick up subtle variations from normal operation that may predict imminent malfunctions. Their approaches vary from analyzing sounds machines make to detecting changes in machine-produced vibrations.

Read more about how machine learning and AI can keep machines and industrial plants operating at: http://bigthink.com/robby-berman/machine-learning-will-help-us-fix-whats-broken-before-it-breaks

Via Big Think

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The Internet of Smart Things – humanizing the IOT

David Grebow, CEO of KnowledgeStar and former co-director of the IBM Institute for Advanced Learning, believes that the Internet of Smart Things (IosT) is the most significant opportunity that has come out of the IoT world, especially for manpower-intensive heavy industries. He spoke with Industrial Internet Now about IosT’s potential to humanize the IoT and realize companies’ returns.

What is the Internet of Smart Things and how does it differ from IoT in its implications on work as we know it?

The IoT was originally designed as an interconnected system of computing devices that could transfer data over a network. The original focus was to enable machine-to-machine transfer and display of data. The primary output was the data that informed a few people about how the interconnected devices were functioning. The emphasis was on managing that data, driving new business value from the investment of the infrastructure supporting the IoT, and finding more effective and efficient ways of doing business made possible by the IoT. It was not focused on how people could more safely and effectively use the machines, since there was no human-to-machine interface.

The Internet of Smart Things™ (IosT) incorporates that human-to-machine interface and uses the interconnected computing devices to alert and inform people about what they need to know and do to safely and effectively do their jobs. Imagine if the equipment you use in the workplace could show you what you need to know about how they operate, tell you how to use them correctly and efficiently in your native language, help you be safer working with or around them, offer you details to complete and submit regulatory forms and checklists. What if they could also show you how to fix them if they are broken, provide you with the schematics and diagrams you need, help you contact a mentor or emergency assistance, and more?

“Imagine if the equipment you use in the workplace could show you what you need to know about how they operate, tell you how to use them correctly and efficiently in your native language. What if they could also show you how to fix them if they are broken, provide you with the schematics and diagrams you need, help you contact a mentor or emergency assistance, and more?”

What if all this information was delivered automatically whenever you were within a short distance of the machine? Imagine if it was instantly and securely viewable from any nearby internet-connected device. Think of the enormous impact that could have: increasing safety, eliminating errors, boosting employee productivity, proving timely compliance, among others. It could dramatically reduce injuries and associated worker’s compensation and insurance costs – all of which would have an immediate and positive effect on the bottom line.

We’ve all heard and read about how the Internet of Things in the home will transform the ways in which we live. We’ve heard for years how your refrigerator is going to send a shopping list to your grocery store, your car will make an appointment for an oil change, and the blinds on your windows will automatically close as dusk falls.

What about the Internet of Things in the workplace? It seems to me that far more people have an immediate need for the machines they work with every day on the job to supply them with specific information.

While I can appreciate that having an expensive lathe machine tell me that there is a problem with the calibration of one of the lathes, having that same piece of machinery provide me with safety warnings, a way to access operational information I may have forgotten, a name of a person to call to solve an immediate problem, or a checklist of compliance issues that need to be completed before I operate it would be far more useful. That’s the Internet of Smart Things.

In the shift to a learning economy, what role will managers play, particularly in companies in more manpower-intensive heavy industries like ports and container handling, mining, automotive and general manufacturing? Also, with relation to industrial jobs, in what ways is IosT an opportunity?

Managers who are currently responsible for providing on-the-spot reminders and remedial training would be free to perform more important managerial jobs. Learning becomes the responsibility of the workers who can find out what they need to know and do using their smart devices – phones, tablets, or Google Glass EE – connected to the machines. Managers’ role will be to enable workers to use the IosT.

Managers will also be able to look at the analytics the IosT returns and see where training is hitting or missing the mark, find out who is acting as a go-to expert for operations or repairs, check to make sure regulatory guidelines and maintenance are being met on time, and more. Managers responsible for training will be able to see what parts of the training are working and which areas need to be revisited and revised.

In your writings, you’ve said that the IosT humanizes the IoT? In what way?

It adds people back into the equation. It takes machines that can essentially talk to one another and gives them the capability to literally talk to the workers operating and maintaining them.

You’ve also mentioned that the return on investment is easier to see with the IosT. How so?

According to the 2016 Training Industry Report, the manufacturing sector alone spent more than $25 million on training that year. Current research informs us that we forget as much as 50% of that training in a matter of days or weeks. That means that every dollar spent returns only 50 cents in value. The IosT is an antidote to forgetting since it provides not only just-in-time information; it can be designed to provide just-for-me initialized training as well.

Safety direct and indirect costs from injuries and accidents in the workplace have been estimated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA – an agency of the United States Department of Labor – to amount to almost $1 billion per week. This ranges from medical payments to repairs of damaged equipment. Smart machines, driven by the IosT, would dramatically cut down these costs by reinforcing safety training and providing safety alerts and instructions. By ensuring that machinery was properly operated and maintained the indirect costs would also be reduced.

What, in your opinion, do responsible developers of technology need to consider in developing IoT systems to make the IosT a reality?

“The value of having a smart machine talking to other smart machines has already proven to be valuable. Incorporating the people who work on those smart machines into the equation makes the IosT even more important.”

The human-machine interface. There is an entire ecosystem that needs to be accounted for. Machine-to-machine data sharing is one element of the ecosystem. Human-to-machine interaction and connection is the other. The value of having a smart machine talking to other smart machines has already proven to be valuable. Incorporating the people who work on those smart machines into the equation makes the IosT even more important. It’s a viewpoint that asks a simple question: How can this technology be used to make life better for the people who work with these interconnected machines every day?

David Grebow heads KnowledgeStar, a US-based consulting firm that provides Fortune 500 corporations, start-ups, NGOs and analyst agencies with insight about the intersection of digital technology and education. His latest book “Minds at Work” will be published in December, 2018 by ATD Press.The Internet of Smart Things™ is trademarked by KnowledgeStar, Inc.

Interview w/ David Grebow

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  • Emon45 03.10.2017 04:11

    Acktive

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With hundreds of choices, how can you pick an IoT platform?

Choosing the right IoT platform among the small industry specific platforms isn’t easy. The market is saturated and there’s no market leader creating one industry standard.

ReadWrite interviews Saverio Romeo, the chief research officer of Beecham Research, who were part of a team creating IoT Pilot, a free, completely independent, analyst-driven tool designed to help enterprises navigate and evaluate the IoT platform landscape. Romeo presumes that data privacy and data ownership need to be discussed industry-wide. “The experience of explaining design innovation to engineers has been quite extraordinary over the last 10 years. I think the next step is to make them aware of how the stuff they do has a social impact. We see some of this emerging in the Horizon 2020 research program. There are a number of initiatives in which your organization can go basically and test the device from an ethical point of view, and so I think there is a move towards that.” Romero concludes.

Read more about the IoT platform ecosphere and its future: https://readwrite.com/2017/07/21/with-over-450-iot-platforms-which-one-will-you-choose-il1/

Via ReadWrite

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Highlights from the Industry of Things World Report 2017

The Industry of Things World Survey Report 2017 sheds light on the state of the IoT market. Based on the views of over 1,100 cross-industry leaders, the focus point is now shifting towards real-world implementation and monetization of industrial IoT. According to Maria Relaki, Portfolio Director at we.CONECT Global Leaders, the organizer of Industry of Things World conference series, industrial IoT has moved from theory to application.

The third annual Industry of Things World Survey investigates the opinions of over 1,100 Internet of Things (IoT) and Industry 4.0 managers working in industries such as manufacturing, information and communication technologies, automotive and transportation, healthcare, chemicals and many more. Conducted online from January to March 2017, the survey covers the current state of the worldwide IoT market.

“The results indicate that IoT is now considered essential to business and not just theory or something that is good to have. Eighty-eight percent of the respondents found industrial IoT critical to their organization’s future success,” comments Maria Relaki, Portfolio Director at we.CONECT Global Leaders. “A key finding is that Industrial IoT has already become mainstream: According to our respondents, adoption of industrial internet is at 91 percent. This means that companies are moving beyond the theoretical planning phase, and they are able to discuss how they are going to roll out their plans or even what they have already achieved with IIoT,” she explains.

Trends and phenomena

Relaki points out that the increasing percentage of use of digital technology—up from last year’s 82% to 91% this year—supports the notion that digital transformation really is the way to go. According to her, moving to the implementation phase means that there is a lot going on in the world of IoT because this stage has so many steps. In addition to the overarching theme of digital transformation, among the hot topics discovered in this year’s survey results are monetization strategies, data analytics, platforms, and improved operating performance. “People have had enough of ‘This is the next big thing’. Now, businesses are expecting results,” says Relaki.

However, some themes remain equally important from year to year. “Forecasting demand, cybersecurity, and interoperability have not lost importance,” Relaki notes. For example, over half of the respondents (55%) think regulation, governance, and security play a very important role in digital transformation, while almost two thirds (62%) found cybersecurity and privacy a hurdle that must be overcome in pursuing digital transformation. The lack of industry standards for interoperability and interconnectivity was the second most significant hurdle (39%) from the respondents’ perspective.

Challenges and opportunities

“Businesses have identified the opportunities of IIoT technologies, and they are now looking for specific solutions to answer their needs.”

The survey identified some of the challenges and opportunities of industrial IoT. “Based on the responses to our open-ended questions, businesses have identified the opportunities of IIoT technologies, and they are now looking for specific solutions to answer their needs,” she says. For example, the majority of respondents expected IIoT to yield new revenue streams and business models (66%) as well as new products and services (66%). The biggest potential IIoT improvement areas were found in plant operating performance through improved maintenance and asset uptime (58%) or through improved execution (48%).

The challenge lies in recognizing innovation and integrating it into business. For instance, when it comes to digital transformation, only four percent of respondents found their company as having both vision and execution in place.

Industry of Things World 2017

Industry of Things World 2017 is a strategic conference that brings together stakeholders from a variety of industries, all with the aim of defining the future of the fourth industrial revolution. Organized by we.CONECT Global Leaders, the event is scheduled to take place in Berlin, Germany, from September 18 to 19, 2017. According to Relaki, approximately 1,000 participants representing over 40 different nationalities are expected to attend.

Key themes of the two-day program include, among others, overcoming integration challenges of industry 4.0 in running businesses, monetizing the IIoT in an industrial setting, the impact of AI, machine learning, and robotics on productivity, and the implications of the convergence of IT and OT in terms of security. “This year, the emphasis is shifting from ideas and intentions to implementation. There will be presentations of actual projects demonstrating real-world applications of IIoT technologies and sessions dedicated to the integration of innovation in companies,” shares Relaki.

Among the conference’s 80-plus speakers are Kevin Ashton, a renowned expert in digital transformation and the one who coined the term “the Internet of Things;” Nigel Upton, Worldwide Director and General Manager IoT and Global Connectivity Platforms at Hewlett Packard Enterprise; Eric Schaeffer, Senior Managing Director at Accenture; and Tanja Rueckert, President IoT and Digital Supply Chain at SAP.

To find out more about the agenda and speakers of Industry of Things World 2017, visit www.industryofthingsworld.com/en/ .

Download the full survey report here.

Maria Relaki works as Portfolio Director at we.CONECT Global Leaders and is responsible for the Industry of Things World global event series.

Image credit: Industry of Things World

Update: Kevin Ashton, who first coined the term ”Internet of Things” talks about the next phase of the Industrial Internet. Video was filmed at the event venue in Berlin.

 

Industrial Internet Now

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7 amazing technologies we’ll see by 2030

The World Economic forum surveyed over 800 experts and executives to find out what the future will actually look like. This Business Insider video shows 7 amazing technologies they think the world will see by 2030.

Watch the video about technology tipping points we will reach by 2030 at: http://www.businessinsider.com/technologies-future-2030-world-economic-forum-tech-video-2017-2?r=US&IR=T&IR=T

Via IoT Business Insider

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