Industrial Internet Now

The need to connect legacy devices to the IIoT

Pre-internet assets lack the connectivity of newer pieces of equipment. These legacy devices, however, still have years of remaining value if they can be linked to the cloud, enabling their data to be analyzed and revealing actionable insights that could perhaps potentially transform business. Wael Elrifai, Sr. Director of Enterprise Solutions at Pentaho, offers insights on how older systems can be made to work with current ones, and talks about the human side of machine learning.

Businesses that have operated for a considerable amount of time will have accumulated several legacy systems over that period. While they have long life-spans, few of these machines will be immediately compatible with one another. The cost of replacing these pre-internet assets to facilitate communication could easily outweigh foreseeable production benefits. What steps must plant managers then take to combine AI capabilities with legacy infrastructure?

Wael Elrifai, Sr. Director of Enterprise Solutions at Pentaho, begins with this premise. “I usually like to remind people that we talk as though data was not generated in the past on these systems. Remember, however, that there’s a lot of robotics involved already, and these systems have sensors that have been producing data for decades. The truth of the matter is that systems such as PLCs (programmable logic controllers) and SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) have already been capturing that data. What you need to do now is to pull the data off those systems. Things like data integration tools are built for that,” he says.

According to Elrifai, predictive maintenance – a technology that drives value in modern manufacturing – isn’t new either. “The difference today is, because the cost of computing and the cost of storage have dramatically reduced, you can do more with it. It’s been a nice positive feedback cycle: Where you can capture more data, you can do more computing work – applied mathematics, machine learning and AI, among others. This then makes capturing data more valuable.”

Conversely, in situations where it’s entirely mechanical and no data or robotics are involved, he suggests looking for proxies for that data. Elrifai adds that while some retrofitting may be required, from his experience a lot of data is already there and is not being used, so it would be best to begin with that.

IIoT implementation across industries

Some industries are more advanced when it comes to IIoT implementation, while others lag. To convince traditional manufacturing companies of the economic benefits of AI investments, Elrifai offers the following examples.  

“The ports industry is already using complex machine learning techniques. The most common one for logistics companies is simulated annealing, a method for schedule optimization that sees to it that cranes are doing the right thing at the right time, and containers are moved according to the right schedule.” Elrifai believes that for some container terminals, it’s mostly about the integration of the larger supply chain.

On the other hand, he recalls a visit to a steel factory that wanted to improve its efficiency. “A couple of times a day, they experienced a very specific kind of failure. This cost about 10 percent of their productivity, and in the steel industry that figure is enormous,” Elrifai explains. Furthermore, the way they knew there was a problem was rather unusual: The control room would start shaking.

While the company wanted to reduce this through predictive maintenance techniques, what they didn’t know was that they were capturing all this data already. Elrifai says like many other companies, this particular steel factory would only look at five, ten or 20 variables, the ones that were in their SCADA system.

“What they didn’t do is integrate this with thousands of other sources. The statistical techniques that factories are doing today are low-dimensionality ones,” he continues, adding that trying to convince groups to do more is a matter of explaining to them that it’s just an evolution of what they are already doing.

Where humans fit in

Another dimension to machine learning and AI is the human factor. As far as the supply chain is concerned, Elrifai is of this opinion. “If you are talking about supervised learning – just prediction, basically – oftentimes the baseline data that you use to train these systems is from humans. And you want these systems to evolve, because systems evolve, factories evolve,” he says. “I think humans are always going to be there, helping to state what the ground truth is. Or, at least for the foreseeable future, they will be doing that.”

In addition, Elrifai points out that in certain cases in factories, several different algorithms are voting whether something is going to fail or not, and a human expert is doing that as well.

“With these kinds of methods – ensembles, if you will – you end up with better outcomes. For instance, the machine by itself might produce 75% accuracy and the human on his or her own might produce 68% accuracy.  When you put them together, you end up with greater performance, say 80% or 85%,” he states. “I think there’s still a lot of room for cooperation. I don’t think the algorithms are taking over just yet.”

How to solve new problems

“The common problem people have with technology is that they search for problems. That makes no sense. Solution? Start with use cases.”

Finally, Elrifai – with his background in data science – offers this essential piece of advice to companies that plan to connect legacy equipment to the IIoT. “The common problem people have with technology is that they search for problems. That makes no sense,” he emphasizes. His solution? Start with use cases.

“I think there’s a sense that this is extremely expensive to do. However, all you really are doing is putting up a basic data engineering or basic machine learning infrastructure – this is low-cost. There’s a lot of automation available now around machine learning,” states Elrifai. “In the data world, when you try to build models, about 80-90% of the effort that is put in is made up of data engineering, feature engineering, preparing data, filtering – all the easy stuff.”

Elrifai believes that a lot of the data prep for data engineering can be done in an automated fashion. “I don’t think people recognize that. They are trying to use old tools to solve new problems,” he concludes.

Wael Elrifai is an author and speaker. He works as Sr. Director of Enterprise Solutions at Pentaho, a data integration and business analytics company with an enterprise-class, open source-based platform for diverse big data deployments.

Implementing AI in Europe’s Businesses, Beyond the Hype

AI Business set out to find out how AI is transforming business today and how it will evolve in the future. They surveyed the C-Suite executives in the UK & Europe’s 300 largest businesses on how they see AI impacting their organizations, understanding their current and future AI projects, concerns and overall strategy. Georgios Kipouros, Research Director at AI Business, writes about the findings of the survey on techUK.

The majority of the leaders thought AI will transform their industry and saw it essential for their organization. Over 80% compared the impact of AI to that of the Internet. The leaders perceived AI as a way to improve efficiency, reduce overall costs, and also a way to enhance accuracy in their operations. Over 80% of Europe’s leading organizations were investing in machine/deep Learning technologies, expecting to spend an average of 4 million Euros per AI project within the next 2 years.

Read more about implementing AI in Europe’s Businesses at http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/10724-implementing-ai-in-europe-s-businesses-beyond-the-hype

Securing IIoT systems still a contractual no man’s land

The industrial internet is a continuously evolving and layered infrastructure built on connected machinery – a large proportion of which has not previously been linked to the internet. The fact that these machines can now be accessed online brings new challenges for IoT service providers as well as their clients. Furthermore, questions remain regarding responsibilities, says Pasi Vilja, Chief Information Security Officer at Konecranes.

Last year, a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack swept through the globe and nearly disrupted the entire internet. Experts called it the largest attack of its kind in history. Afterwards, close investigation revealed that the assault had been orchestrated completely through IoT devices. A huge number of web cameras were left unprotected, and this offered an easy opportunity for hackers to mount a large-scale attack via the internet.

“This is a great example of the vulnerabilities born out of millions of unprotected devices suddenly being connected to the internet. As the number of internet connected devices continues to grow, new vulnerabilities also arise, bringing forth questions about internet safety which we haven’t faced before,” Vilja says.

The need for shared solutions to these questions is growing increasingly dire as more and more machines – many of which were designed before the advent of the IoT era – are connected into the internet, and operated in ways which couldn’t have been considered at the time they were made.

Implementing security measures in the era of IoT

According to Vilja, security in the context of the industrial internet can be implemented mainly through the same types of practices already used in securing computer networks. Keeping up a proper firewall, requiring identification, and constantly surveying and reacting to problems that arise quickly are important, as is updating software.

“The same principles work in both an ordinary IT context and an IoT environment. On the software level, there isn’t that much of a difference in how the systems can be kept safe in either setting. Still, the industrial context adds a layer of complexity to the equation,” Vilja says.

One of the greatest differences in terms of web security in an industrial context is the machinery’s long lifecycle, which brings forth new questions on service providers’ responsibility to offer their clients updates for extended periods.
“Some machinery in industrial use still run on Windows XP or even NT. For the former, support ended in 2014 – ­ and for the latter, in 2004. How are we going to ensure that systems will be kept secure when some of the machines have lifecycles of 50 years? These are still questions to be discussed,” Vilja says.

Another issue comes up with the variety of machines being connected to the web. Industrial companies might have a combination of old, non-connected machinery which is now being connected to the web, point-to-point connected machines, and newer internet connected machines. When they open all these machines gradually to the internet, questions arise on how to make sure that no gaps are left between the different ways to connect.

Discussions about responsibilities still underway

Who has the ultimate responsibility regarding the IoT solutions in use and keeping them up to date? Is it the service providers? And if so, then how long and how actively do they have to ensure that the security is current? According to Vilja, these questions are still open for discussion, and no concrete best practices have surfaced yet.

“This is very much a discussion still to be had. Service providers must take responsibility to ensure that the services they offer are maintained to protect against new security threats. But only the clients know their full set-up and probably don’t want automatic updates from multiple providers. And how knowledgeable are the clients about the relevant security features or risks? This is still a contractual no man’s land,” Vilja says.

Another concern is that in highly specialized systems that have been tweaked or integrated by clients, the updates could cause interruptions – or even shutdowns –  in their operations. On the other hand, refraining or neglecting to update their systems could also end up leaving their entire systems vulnerable.

According to Vilja, in order to form proper guidelines, open discussion and continuous surveillance are essential. Eventually, the best practices will be formed, and they are likely to follow precedents from the computer market.

Ultimately, the same rules apply to web cameras and smart refrigerators as for industrial sensors – basic security measures go a long way, and they must actually be implemented in order to ensure operational safety.

Pasi Vilja is the Chief Information Security Officer at Konecranes.

Looking for the human-machine touch

Digital technology is fast changing the way vehicles are built, but the pace of change varies according to different manufacturers and production processes. Above all, the importance of human workers has been central to the decision process for new technology – and looks set to remain so in the future.

According to Automotive Logistics, experts who spoke at automotiveIT Forum – Production and Logistics, which took place during the recent Hannover Messe, stressed that digitalization starts on the shop floor. Implementing logistics automation and support technology needs to be done with workers in mind – including their safety and comfort, but also their skills. For instance, Dr. Sabine Pfeiffer, professor of sociology at the University of Hohenheim, noted that the industry tends to focus on university graduates or consultancies, “but if you work with the experience and skills on the shop floor, you will get great results.”

Read more on how to begin disruption at the shop floor level: http://automotivelogistics.media/intelligence/looking-human-machine-touch

Image credit: Zapp2Photo / Shutterstock.com

The art of Simply-Complex and IIoT

The essence of the IIoT involves lots of “things” that will need to work harmoniously to be effective. But if the architecture is not designed right at the start, the opportunities afforded by this technology may collapse under the weight of all these many things.

According to Michael Davis, Senior Program Manager, Field Devices, at Schneider Electric, creating “simple” is actually not so simple. In a post on the Industrial Internet Consortium blog, he says that the concept of Simply-Complex is to challenge the architecture of the system and to start with a foundation that is comprised of simple building blocks that can be reconfigured, resequenced, and recycled into more complex structures. The winners in the future of the IIoT will be those who adopt the most elegant solutions.

Read more about simplicity as the foundation of the design: http://blog.iiconsortium.org/2017/04/the-art-of-simply-complex-and-iiot.html

Michael Davis and Matthew Carrar’s White Paper on The Art of Simply-Complex and IIoT can be found here: http://www.schneider-electric.com/en/download/document/9982095_02-20-17A_EN/

Image credit:  Olga Morkotun / Shutterstock.com

How can Industry 4.0 help the global steel industry achieve greater efficiencies?

Taking place in Warsaw, Poland, the Future Steel Forum assembles speakers from academia and the steel industry to examine how technological innovations can revolutionize steel production. Matthew Moggridge, Editor of Steel Times International, talks about the themes and perspectives steelmakers must consider as they shift to a digital manufacturing platform.

According to the 2016 Global Industry 4.0 Survey conducted by the consulting firm PwC, the buzz surrounding Industry 4.0 has moved on from what some had earlier considered as hype to actual investment and real results. This investment, in turn, is translating into increasingly advanced levels of digitization and integration. 67% of respondents from the metals sector, among them companies in the steel industry, say they expect to reach advanced levels of digitization in their vertical value chains by 2020.

Matthew Moggridge, Editor of Steel Times International, shares a similar view. “The steel industry is well prepared for Industry 4.0 and has, for a long time, been at the forefront of industrial technological development,” he says.

“There are companies, such as Primetals Technologies, SMS group, Danieli Automation, Fives, among others, who have been pushing the boundaries of digital manufacturing and partnering with leading steelmakers such as ArcelorMittal, Tata Steel, Voestalpine and many others to develop the concept of Industry 4.0.”

Moggridge adds that in the US, Big River Steel is arguably the first smart steel plant. The company recently partnered with Noodle.ai, a San Francisco-based Enterprise Artificial Intelligence company, to implement Enterprise AI to optimize operations at the former’s scrap metal recycling and steel production facility in Osceola, Arkansas.

“On the one hand, digitization has moved from being an augmenting capability for steel companies to something that is now becoming a disruptive force. On the other hand, it is delivering supply chain agility, deeper process understanding and higher production utilization.”

Efficiencies and challenges

Broadly speaking, Industry 4.0 assists the global steel industry in its quest for greater efficiencies while raising new concerns. On the one hand, as digitization has moved from being an augmenting capability for steel companies to something that is now becoming a disruptive force, the PwC report says that it is delivering supply chain agility, deeper process understanding and higher production utilization.

The report states: “Automation is combining with data analytics to enable much higher flexibility as well as more efficiency in production. Algorithms are linking the physical properties of the materials with production costs and plant constraints to improve efficiency. Processes that were previously separated are now being integrated, leading to reductions of heat loss, energy consumption, throughput time, inventory as well as better price optimization.”

On the other hand, the people aspect also needs to be addressed. PwC states that companies will need to make sure staff members understand how the company is evolving and how they can be a part of the change. From PwC’s interviews with metals companies, the biggest challenges involve issues such as culture, leadership and the economic case for change.

In addition, Moggridge cites Dirk Schaefer, assistant professor of design engineering at the University of Bath, UK, who argues that the development of a new work force will also prove challenging within the context of Industry 4.0. Schaefer believes that investing in workforce education is essential. “Each of the previous industrial revolutions resulted in a surge of unemployment. There is no reason to believe that this will be any different this time around, unless preventive action is taken today,” Schaefer asserts.

 

Conference overview

These topics will be addressed by experts at the Future Steel Forum in Warsaw, which takes place today and tomorrow. Other discussion points include the impact of smart manufacturing on the steel industry, Industry 4.0 and its implications for plant safety, the future of cooperation between automation and steel manufacturing, and the role of human beings in the factory of the future.

Taking part are speakers from academia, the steel industry and the world of steel production technology such as Dr. Rizwan A Janjua, Head of Technology, World Steel Association; Jose Favilla, Director, Industry Solutions for Industrial Products, IBM; and Professor Chris Hankin, Imperial College London, among others.

Connecting the dots

As for Industry 4.0-related themes that are set to gain ever greater prominence in the coming years, Moggridge, who will deliver the welcoming and closing remarks at the event, has this to share. “Cyber security will always be a big issue that will constantly need to be addressed, but also the role of the human being in an increasingly automated environment, not only in steel but in other areas of industry as well,” he says.

“What people tend to forget about the steel industry is that it is already a very automated environment. In many ways, it’s just a case of connecting the dots before steelmakers can claim to be true advocates of Industry 4.0.”

Matthew Moggridge is the Editor of Steel Times International. The Future Steel Forum takes place in Warsaw, Poland, on June 14–15, 2017. futuresteelforum.com

How the Internet of Things impacts supply chains

Enterprise resource planning and supply chain management (SCM) have gone hand-in-hand for quite some time, but the IoT revolution will allow those solutions to be enhanced by intelligently connecting people, processes, data, and things via devices and sensors.

“Think of it as SCM 2.0,” writes Udaya Shankar, Vice President and Head of Internet of Things for Xchanging, a business process service provider for the global insurance industry. According to Shankar’s article in Inbound Logistics, this deeper intelligence can come to life in many different ways when it comes to supply chain data and intelligence – from the automation of the manufacturing process to improved visibility within the warehouse.

One area that Shankar believes will play a prominent role in the future supply chain, as it’s impacted by IoT, is in-transit visibility. “The logistics ecosystem has many players, and thus, many moving parts. Products are handled and transferred between the manufacturer, suppliers, the distribution center, retailer, and customer.”

Read more about how IoT can help supply chain professionals at:
http://www.inboundlogistics.com/cms/article/how-the-internet-of-things-impacts-supply-chains/

Image credit: Lightspring / Shutterstock.com

Combining mixed data – unlocking the real value of IoT

Most companies are at a design and test phase in terms of Industrial Internet solutions. Integration into larger, complex systems remains somewhere on the horizon. The full potential of the gathered data will only be truly realized once comprehensive integration into these complex systems becomes a prominent trend. Niall O’Doherty, Director of Business Development Emerging Industries Team at Teradata Corporation, hopes that within five years, the technology necessary for such integration will be commonplace. The question then becomes — will corporate philosophies match the capabilities of these technologies?

Data environments are being inherently redefined due to developments across IoT and IIoT. To do away with detached data “pockets” – which is to say, with data that remains unintegrated into systems or with other data – an overall process of synthesis is necessary. Key to such a synthesis, and subsequent realization of the true value of IoT and IIoT, will be the integration of the already widespread use of sensor data.

“To get to the real transformational value, more of these systems must be put into place. In order for that to happen, sensor data needs to be integrated with product data, customer data, ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) data and other traditional data. For many organizations, bringing sensor data together with traditional data – and making sense of it all – is still a major challenge,” states Niall O’Doherty.

“I hope that in the next five years we will be able to regard sensor data connected to communications infrastructure as a common feature of business,” he continues.

The increasing flow and current of data across organizations and systems naturally raises pertinent questions about data ownership. The fact that once data enters ecosystems, no single organization, agency or equipment manufacturer is going to have exclusive control of the data and its distribution, casts doubts over the approach of companies and – according to O’Doherty – over the attitudes of individuals.

“Are people going to be willing to share all this information? Are they going to be willing to take the output of their particular optimized process, and put it into the input of another, so that we can build a better understanding of what’s going on in a complex manufacturing environment? I think that a lot these commercial and cultural issues will need to be resolved, otherwise they can really trip up organizations.”

“I hope that in the next five years we will be able to regard sensor data connected to communications infrastructure as a common feature of business.”

Making sense of sensors

With the capacity to extract data from vast processes becoming more prominent, complex analytics must process data in ways that allow for more than simply deciphering averages and statistics. According to O’Doherty, this is particularly imperative for industrial and manufacturing companies.

“With the volumes that sensor data is generating, especially in the industrial world, coupled with the complexity of analytics, you really need to bring the analytics and algorithms to the data. In order to do that, you need a scalable IoT platform.”

In the material handling industry, such a platform could facilitate anything from predictive analytics to looking at how employees move on a factory floor, thus optimizing operations accordingly. O’Doherty uses the enhanced oil industry as an example. By putting highly instrumented equipment on rigs and sensors on the ocean-floor, the Industrial Internet has greatly aided in efficiency and optimizations of complex processes and systems. “What’s innovative for them is how they are now using vast amounts of data to understand the subsurface a lot better,” O’Doherty says.

Same products, new services

For O’Doherty, the creation of new business models via sensor data is not necessarily at the crux of Industrial Internet developments. Instead, he sees business models created for existing products as reaping the benefits of the Industrial Internet in the future.

“I see the power of sensor data and the Industrial Internet in allowing organizations to implement a scale for different business models. Those models may already exist, but as a result of this new data, they can be made more profitable and customer-oriented. It’s about understanding and mitigating risk so that you can potentially implement multiple models for the same products: to different markets, companies or customers.” This also increases the likelihood of new services emerging indirectly from existing products.

The notion of selling services, as opposed to products, is a concrete example of how the evolution of the Industrial Internet allows for the modification of, or experimentation with, existing business models. “For example, the notion of Power by the Hour – meaning a company won’t sell their customers an engine or a train, but instead the power needed to run them – was in fact coined in the 1960s by Bristol Siddeley. So, it’s not necessarily a new business model,” O’Doherty notes. Interestingly, later that decade Bristol Siddeley was bought out by Rolls Royce, currently one of the forerunners in embracing the Industrial Internet.

In order for the rest of the manufacturing world to keep up with the likes of Rolls Royce, O’Doherty reminds CIOs and CEOs of their roles as “enablers,” who first and foremost allow for businesses to change the way they approach products and services in general. “My advice – to a CIO in particular – would be to ensure you build the right infrastructure and environment to allow people in your company to access the data they need, and add the analysis they want,” O’Doherty concludes.

Niall O’Doherty works as Director of Business Development Emerging Industries Team at Teradata Corporation

Image credit: alphaspirit / Shutterstock.com

The future of IoT and machine learning – what role will humans play?

Despite having been around for over two decades, machine learning and its integration into business models is yet to become commonplace. Jari Salminen, Managing Director of Cumulocity, has witnessed the unfolding of machine learning and noted the progress made in its adoption into a wide range of industries over recent years. He says that rather than spend time in building grand strategies then assume that value can immediately be realized, companies should take pragmatic steps to connect their assets and start collecting data.

“What we are seeing today is that there typically exists a bit of a delay when companies start connecting assets and collecting information to be able to rely on machine learning algorithms and their accuracy,” says Salminen. “The training of these algorithms requires large amounts of data and thus time. It takes time for any individual company to move through the cycle of starting with very basic use cases and moving onto more complex algorithms and dependencies, and eventually introducing machine learning.”

At Cumulocity, Salminen deals with several manufacturing and industrial companies. He recognizes companies that require warehouses – or those whose supply chains do – currently expect sophisticated IoT solutions from a production and manufacturing point of view.

“Things are changing at such a pace that it is now very cost efficient even for smaller companies to deploy off-the-shelf IoT solutions for their supply chains.”

Salminen encourages companies who have examined the cost of IoT solutions for manufacturing or supply chain management over recent years to do so again. “Things are changing at such a pace that it is now very cost efficient even for smaller companies to deploy off-the-shelf IoT solutions for their supply chains as the price of hardware, connectivity and software has dramatically reduced over the last 5 years,” he reasons.

Holding algorithms accountable

The accuracy and efficiency at which these solutions can be implemented will greatly depend on the algorithms triggering them. According to Salminen, the more automated these algorithms become, the greater influence they will have not only on supply chains, but beyond them as well.

“Today, most actions are still done by human users and there are several reasons why that is. For example, accountability – in the long-term, we will need to ask how this will change. Will decisions be made based solely on the algorithms that machine learning will make possible? Maybe. However, such questions and their answers go beyond technology itself, as they are concerned with making sure that somebody other than a computer takes responsibility for decisions. It’s a complex domain,” Salminen says.

So, how to legally and ethically approach decision-making when no human is involved in the process? Very similar questions are currently being asked in the automotive industry.

Closely tied to the accountability of machine-to-machine decision-making within IoT projects is the matter that is security. In general, issues surrounding security are never too far away when connectivity, machines and material networks are concerned.

Multilevel security management

“The issue with security is that it exists on so many levels in IoT projects: from hardware – meaning devices, machines and assets – and connectivity, whether that entails using mobile connections or new narrowband IoT solutions, to the backend, meaning the cloud or servers. On top of all that you might have special applications for company users, partners or even consumers. Security needs to be controlled and monitored at all these levels.”

“Often, security breaches take place when more than one area has been overlooked. A most common area attracting hackers and attacks is wherever any connected device exposes ports reachable from the internet. These are being scanned by hackers,” Salminen continues. He reminds companies that if they are dealing with hardware, that they should keep their wide area network ports closed; from a connectivity perspective, they must make sure that everything is fully encrypted in transit.

“If you are providing cloud services on top of hardware and connectivity, make sure that your whole system is robust and secure. Ultimately, there is no single thing companies must consider when it comes to security, but rather, it is an area that must be owned end-to-end by someone in the project.”

Setting future standards

When asked how he sees the future of machine learning and IoT taking shape, Salminen is simultaneously restrained and excited. He sees industries as being past the initial hype. The implementation of more advanced and sophisticated use cases is now becoming a reality.

“The connectivity costs per device are decreasing, and thus enabling many new developments when it comes to industrial solutions. This is happening across widespread assets, meaning that for example, narrowband technologies are becoming more popular. However, what is still lacking from IoT and will need to be addressed in the next few years is standardization.”

While Salminen is adamant that a comprehensive philosophy regarding standardization must be adopted, he does not foresee the use of one single underlying standard that will apply across industries.

“My guess is that there won’t be an overarching standard that will include everything from devices to data structures. There will be so many different IoT use cases that it will be impossible to create something that would cover all of them,” he says. “We see lot of traction with MQTT (Message Queuing Telemetry Transport) as a messaging protocol due to the fact it doesn’t even try to standardize all parts of the IoT stack. For example, it does not deal with message payload format which is left to the developer to decide.”

On the other hand, Salminen believes that standards like Lightweight M2M by Open Mobile Alliance are not being picked up by market players because probably it doesn’t fit many use cases, among other reasons.

Nonetheless, he reminds those looking to initiate IoT projects to certainly consider available standards, but not to be limited by them. He also states that the key thing to ensure is that you are not locked into any standard, but to have flexibility in case your needs change in the future.

“If I were starting an IoT project, I would be looking at the most recent connectivity options, the role of standards, if such exist, and whether or not they are relevant to my business. However, I wouldn’t force any standards at the moment, as there are in fact very few that are relevant,” Salminen concludes.

 

Image credit: ImageFlow/ Shutterstock.com

The problem with IIoT design

As with all trends and innovations in their infancy, there is bound to be some premature efforts deemed as groundbreaking, when in reality they fail to sustain their relevant functionality beyond initial hype. According to EE Times editor Rich Quinnell, this has been the case with IoT design. “All too often the design behind these [IoT] devices is not all that smart. It’s clever, it’s innovative, but IoT designs are also all too often piecemeal and rushed to market. What’s being created is a system of systems, without the system-level design issues getting addressed,” Quinnell writes.

The Object Management Group (OMG) is nonetheless providing a remedy for “correcting IoT’s trajectory.” For his EE Times piece, Quinnell spoke to Matthew Hause and Graham Bleakly of OMG to find make sense of the issues surrounding current approaches to IoT design. “We’re trying to get people away from building the IoT by hacking,” says Bleakley.

Read more on Hause’s and Bleakly’s thoughts at: http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=8&doc_id=1331075

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