Industrial Internet Now
Subscribe
Contribute
Loading...
×

(Updated: post chat) Announcing the first Industrial Internet Now #IINChat

Thanks to all who participated in the first #IINChat with a topic ‘’#OpenData for innovation /or standardization in #manufacturing’’ held on the 27th May, 2016. The informative discussion lasted approximately one hour and provided some notable interesting ideas and clarifications about using Open Data for the manufacturing industry by experts from around the world.

The selected questions were:

Q1. How does the usage of Open Data compare with the use of Big Data in manufacturing?

Q2. What initiatives on Open Data should manufacturing people be paying attention to?

Q3. Are there interesting technologies currently available that make Open Data more manageable for manufacturing?
Q4. Are there opportunities to use Open Data to generate revenue for manufacturing companies?

Q5. What industries have the best opportunities for using Open Data? Who will be first to fully adopt?

Notable tweets/contributions to the chat:

 


Original Post

Industrial Internet Now will moderate a regularly scheduled Twitter chat (#IINChat) focused on creating public discussion around Industrial Internet topics for heavy industry and material handling. We are looking for experts and interested specialists to participate in the chat and share knowledge on the possibilities and challenges facing industries, such as but not limited to steel, shipping & ports, pulp & paper, manufacturing, waste-to-energy and automotive. We are also looking for questions and comments from the people who live with the realities of the new emerging Industrial Internet world. As a public chat held on Twitter, anyone is invited to share their thoughts. Welcome!

Date: 27 May, 2016 13:00 (EET) – 13:30

Topic: ‘Open Data for innovation /or standardization in #manufacturing.

Example Questions:

  • What initiatives on Open Data should manufacturing people be paying attention to?
  • Are there specific Open Data sets that are currently available that will help manufacturers?
  • How does the usage of Open Data compare with the use of Big Data in manufacturing?
  • What are the best use cases for Open Data in a manufacturing environment?
  • What are the restrictions / concerns with using Open Data among heavy machines?
  • What industries have the best opportunities for using Open Data? Who will be first to fully adopt?
  • Companies utilize services between industries (e.g. automotive and shipping). How can Open Data help lower costs in this area?
  • How long will it be before Open Data and its standardization take hold in mainstream manufacturing?
  • Are there opportunities to use Open Data to generate revenue for manufacturing companies?
  • If Open Data standards are adopted, are there practices or services that will be eliminated in manufacturing companies?
  • Are there interesting technologies currently available that make Open Data more manageable for manufacturers?

The IIN Chat format:

Industrial Internet Now will periodically host a Twitter chat on various Industrial Internet subjects using the hashtag #IINChat. At the end of the chat session, respondents can see a summary of conversations as an updated version of this post and continue the conversation in the comments section. Please also feel free to suggest topics for the next #IINChat.

 

Industrial Internet Now

Join the conversation!

Your email address will not be published.

Fabricating takes a quantum leap through digitization

Anders Lindh offers a glimpse on what the Industrial Internet can offer for fabricators from data gathering and processing to different cloud capabilities. In this article from The Fabricator, Lindh examines the benefits offered by the Industrial Internet on a wide scale. On all meters his conclusion is the same – productivity rises and the occurrence of errors due to human behavior lessens. According to Lindh, through the functions offered “a fabricator could make a quantum leap in productivity, quality, and machine efficiency”.

Read more on how the Industrial Internet affects fabricators at http://www.thefabricator.com/article/shopmanagement/theres-strength-in-numbers-how-the-industrial-internet-of-things-applies-to-fabricators

Image credit: guteksk7 / Shutterstock.com

Via The Fabricator

Join the conversation!

Your email address will not be published.

The big picture unravels – step by step

The discussion about the possibilities around Industrial Internet is often limited to trying to define the benefits. Hakim Laukkoski, Business Unit Director at Affecto, demands for more patience and a somewhat less far-reaching perspective. “Nobody knows what the future holds. Finding the answers requires taking the full journey together with our customers,” he notes.

Learning to utilize technological intelligence to its full potential is a journey that unfortunately doesn’t offer any shortcuts. According to Laukkoski, the evolution of Industrial Internet can very well be compared to the development of the global petroleum industry.

“At first, there was just oil pouring up from under the ground. People didn’t know what to do with it, so they used it for something as small and simple as oil lamps. And now, our entire industrialized society is based on oil. I think there is a similar process going on with data,” he reflects.

The formation of new data, of course is at the very core of the Industrial Internet and intelligent devices. But making it valuable requires learning how to use it. Only when we come up with new ways of utilizing the harvested data is when innovations and new business models are born.

Laukkoski, however, is concerned that we are too hasty when it comes to business development. “People see all the data that new technologies are bringing and jump to some kind of conclusions about it right away. It is like trying to cross the finish line when you’re still on your mark.”

As another concrete analogy Laukkoski brings up the evolution of the internet. At first, it replaced the telephone and the fax machine at work places. The benefits were in changing the way people communicate on a daily basis. Back then, nobody could predict how it would change commerce and banking too, for example. But it did.

Creating value through networking

Playing it safe is the enemy of truly remarkable innovations. An old-fashioned approach to business is trying to calculate the possible outcome before taking any measures, and urging for crystallization from an idea that is still in the process of taking shape.

“The journey itself is what sharpens the ideas, and we just need to be patient and take those steps one at a time even if we have no clue where the path will lead us.  When you find an answer to a certain question, there will probably be another question waiting right around the corner,” Laukkoski says.


“At first, there was just oil pouring up from under the ground. People didn’t know what to do with it, so they used it for something as small and simple as oil lamps. And now, our entire industrialized society is based on oil. I think there is a similar process going on with data,”

With digitalization and new technologies, experimenting for companies is now easier than ever before, and doesn’t necessarily require massive investments. Many traditional manufacturers have this to learn from startups: do not wait and see. Instead, take the leap into the unknown and believe that eventually it will pay off.

Another characteristic of today’s startup culture is creating value through networking. Combining business and technology know-how with analytics helps generate new kind of observations, which then are redefined into new ideas. Achieving this requires combining forces of different individuals.

“Together we are stronger than apart, and that is simply a fact. Nevertheless, when you have done something for, say, tens of years, accepting help and ideas from outside may not be easy. In startups, on the contrary, it is usually okay not to master everything, because then you are more likely to come up with really fresh ideas about how to utilize a certain function, which until then, may have been used to serve a completely different purpose. Co-creation together with the customers, or end-users, is vital for success. It’s a common journey.”

From analytics to advisory services

According to Laukkoski, the next business trend in the world of Industrial Internet is the automation of analytical processes. Laukkoski names soft sensors as an example of an application that generates an advisory-type of service from existing data by using predictive algorithms.

”In practice, this can already be seen in newer industrial machinery with a fuel economy meter. Intelligent devices start giving guidance to their users on how to use them to get the optimal result,” he expounds.

Until recently, the equipment has harvested data from its surroundings and operating conditions.  But now, the idea is to insert some of that data into the equipment already in the R&D phase, which then can be transformed into software that gives guidance to the user on, for example, operational and energy-efficiency.

Monitoring equipment’s energy consumption is a theme that will surely continue to inspire developing different kinds of advisory services around it. Saving energy is usually easily transformed into cost savings – and of course appreciated by the public as well.

“You could even say that the journey of business development should begin from the end. First, you need to think about what the customer or the end user mostly values. Then you take it backwards from there, until you reach the starting point. This usually results in greater success than the other way around,” Laukkoski concludes.

Hakim Laukkoski works as Business Unit Director, Industrial at Affecto.

Image credit: ChristianChan / Shutterstock.com

Interview w/ Hakim Laukkoski

Join the conversation!

Your email address will not be published.

What is the key benefit that digitalization brings to manufacturing?

The Internet of Manufacturing was held in Munich on April 5 – 6.2016 and Industrial Internet Now was present. Consisting of inspirational keynotes, panel discussions and networking activities, Internet of Manufacturing drew decision-makers together to gain a deeper business and technical understanding of Industry 4.0 and the Industrial Internet landscape.

We asked six experts on what they think is the key benefit that digitalization brings to manufacturing.

Image credit: Internet of Business

by Industrial Internet Now

1 Comments

Sort by Newest

Join the conversation!

Your email address will not be published.

What are the current trends in smart manufacturing today?

The Internet of Manufacturing was held in Munich on April 5 – 6.2016 and Industrial Internet Now was present. Consisting of inspirational keynotes, panel discussions and networking activities, Internet of Manufacturing drew decision-makers together to gain a deeper business and technical understanding of Industry 4.0 and the Industrial Internet landscape.

We interviewed six experts on what they see are the current trends in smart manufacturing today.

by Industrial Internet Now

Join the conversation!

Your email address will not be published.